TBL Newsletter – September 28, 2020

Here are a handful of great ideas for pediatric therapy, business and life:

Links with an * are affiliate links. Read more here.

AN AMAZING APP FOR STRUGGLING READERS

Learning Ally is a genius audiobook app and library for children (or adults) with documented learning disabilities.

It allows you to listen to a book while you follow along with the text. The text is highlighted as the book is narrated. 

This app is so cool because it

School districts have begun to implement it with their special education and resource programs. There’s also an app for home use.

Because of their licensing agreements with publishers, they are only allowed to sell the app to people with documented learning disabilities (you have to submit documentation). Once you are approved, the cost is $135 a year.

You can browse their library here.

HOW TO BE ON TV

PR is a very effective (and free!) marketing strategy for your practice, but it can be really uncomfortable for those of us who hate being in the spotlight.

Over the course of my career I’ve been asked to give quotes for websites, interviews for magazines and photographs for newspaper articles relating to OT. Occasionally I’ve been asked to discuss therapy topics on television. These aren’t things they prepare you for in OT school.

I’m a pretty introverted person, so being in the news is not my idea of a good time. Yet, the reality of business is that you have to put yourself out there or you’ll have no business.

If you practice long enough, you’ll likely have opportunities to contribute to articles and podcasts. Here are some pointers that may help you. These are things I wish I had known before I ever started a business.

Here’s a practical guide on to how to handle publicity. 

If you want to learn more about how to get free PR, this is a great, beginner-friendly book: Free PR*.

WHAT IT’S LIKE TO GET EI SERVICES AS A CHILD

We are all guilty of failing to understand the child’s perspective when providing therapy. Not just in the moment, but in a holistic way. What’s it like to be a child who has to get therapy for years at a time?

I recently came across an article written by a graduate of early intervention services. It’s written as a letter to parents of children in therapy, which makes it very shareable.

Some take-aways:

You can read the article here.

SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT

“The main lesson I have learned about children with complex conditions is that you can’t just treat what is observable—the obvious core symptoms of autism; you must look below the surface to the root causes of problems, deeper into the biology of the child, to find solutions.”

Theresa Hamlin, Autism And The Stress Effect*

REFLECTIVE PRACTICE QUESTION

How do you help parents “look below the surface” when dealing with their child’s challenging behaviors?  

Have a great week!

Ashley King, MSR, OTR/L
Founding Editor
pediatricOTcourses.com
 

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 P.P.S. We are really proud to be sponsoring the 2020 STAR Sensory Symposium!

Click the image to sign up (scholarship opportunities are available)!

star symposium