TBL Newsletter – August 24, 2020

Here are a handful of great ideas for pediatric therapy, business and life:

RICH PEOPLE NEGOTIATE

The phrase “salary negotiation” can induce a cold sweat faster than any other phrase in
the English language (with the possible exception of “IRS audit”). This is true for employees and employers. It’s a rare person who can find the fun in salary negotiations.

I think part of the reason we avoid salary negotiations is that we don’t really understand what goes into paying an employee. We are afraid of asking for $5000 more because we don’t realize that $5000 is just a drop in the bucket compared to the total cost of hiring an employee.

Patrick McKenzie wrote this great article about salary negotiation a while back. The article was written for a tech audience, but I think it applies to all of us.

It’s worth reading again before you apply for a new job, hire a new employee, or walk into your next performance review.

In this articles he covers

— the total cost of hiring an employee

— why your salary negotiation is not just about your salary

— how to think of salary negotiations

— why your employer is not thinking about salary negotiations the same way you are

My favorite quote from the article:

“The reality is that rich, successful people negotiate.  (This is one important way in which they get — and stay —
rich.)”

Read it here.

EXERCISE IMPROVES ADHD (DUH)

As therapists, we’ve always known that movement improves a child’s behavior and performance in therapy. But it’s not always easy to convince parents and teachers that they should be incorporating more movement into daily routines.

Here’s a resource that may help. This is a great article about how even small amounts of exercise can improve the academic performance of a child with ADHD.
I’ve already emailed a link to several of the families I treat.

Some key take-aways:

— the evidence shows that even short movement breaks over the course of a school day can improve a child’s attention and behavior

— this is a fantastic youtube channel for dance-along movement breaks

— being active outside (as in, nature) is ideal

Get the article here.

NEW FAVES

We’re always on the hunt for new resources to incorporate into face-to-face therapy and teletherapy sessions.

These are some of our recent finds that you may like too.

— Printable animal yoga pose cards from the Wyoming Early Child Network

— Liana Lowenstein, MSW, has some great ideas for teletherapy but I can think of a ton of ways to incorporate some of these ideas into face-to-face therapy, too

PlayingCards.io lets you play games like Go Fish and Checkers during teletherapy sessions

White Noise Lite is an app that comes with tons of high quality background sounds. The free version offers these sounds:

“Air Conditioner, Airplane Travel, Amazon Jungle, Beach Waves Crashing, Blowing Wind,
Blue Noise, Boat Swaying in Water, Brown Noise, Camp Fire, Cars Driving, Cat Purring, Chimes Chiming, City Streets,
Clothes Dryer, Crickets Chirping, Crowded Room, Dishwasher Rinsing, Extreme Rain Pouring, Frogs at Night,
Grandfather Clock, Hair Dryer Blowing, Heartbeat, Heavy Rain Pouring, Light Rain Pouring, Ocean Waves Crashing,
Oscillating Fan, Pink Noise, Rain on Car Roof, Rain Storm, Running Shower, Running Water, Stream Water Flowing,
Thunder Storm, Tibetan Singing Bowl, Train Ride, Vacuum Cleaner, Violet Noise, Water Dripping, Water Sprinkler,
White Noise”

Some ways to use it:

— to help improve concentration during desk work

— as part of a sleep routine

— working on auditory processing

— sound effects for pretend play

White Noise Lite for iPhone

White Noise Lite for Android

SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT

“Not every opinion needs to be voiced. Not every emotion needs to be expressed.

A key question: does what you’re about to share align with your values?

It’s good to be true to your thoughts and feelings in the moment. It’s better to be true to your guiding principles in life.”

-Adam Grant

 REFLECTIVE PRACTICE QUESTION

How am I staying true to my values during my therapy sessions? Are my values ever in conflict with what my patient’s family needs from me?

Have a great week!
Ashley King, MSR, OTR/L
Founding Editor
pediatricOTcourses.com